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J-man

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Cool, thanks for the write up. Cluffie's response made sense but nothing like more dirt bike tech.

All my old kx's are nikasil - it amazes me how tough a bore  it is. I've never trashed or worn out one. But I still get long piston life so as you and Cluffie have written its probably in the ports.

When you measure them at 50 hours do they still have much left in them?

My old KXs run standard cast pistons and don't have the coatings like they have now. No idea what sort of rings the standard ones are. I haven't compared my 03 kx 250 piston / ports to a current model 2 stroke but it still seems to make good power and torque compared to the current 250/300 bikes, be interesting  to see the differences in pistons / ports. I've got the map for my porting somewhere, I'm guessing curiosity will eventually get the better of me and I'll be searching for a current bike models map to compare it to.

On my KX500 which has a pretty big piston / skirt and runs at lower peak revs the pistons last an incredibly long time (athough its been ported and had the compression raised a lot). It's the kickstarters that tend to wear and eventually break (I'm on my 4th one and they're not cheap).

One thing I have noticed on my 2014 KTM 350 4 stroke is how difficult it is to get the air filter to seat properly. I've had to show a few people some tricks after they've sucked dirt which probably doesn't help piston life.

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On 3/6/2019 at 11:22 AM, BearMX said:

I've never changed pistons so frequently, anyone know why pistons wear out so quickly now? Are the exhaust ports so big now that there's hardly any surface left to take all the thrust that loads up the trailing side of the piston? Are the tolerances, materials and cooling systems causing them to not last? I remember pulling a stock uncoated cast piston out after a year of a tank and a half of fuel a week use (MX racing, desert, trail use) and it being well within spec and putting it back in with a new set of rings for another year.

 

I find people are getting smarter as i dont see alot of blown engine mid ride as people want maximum power as we all see that 300 hour old bike kick around from time to time that hard to start and low on power from taken a chance but for me i said 80 hour max if you dont want to see big lost in power as we buy high power bike for one reason and that performance as it amazing how much difference the power  you get back at  80hour piston change and another thing is a fan as i wouldnt ever buy a bike with out it as it a game changer  money well spent  

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+1 on the fan, although not a smoker my old 2013 350 excf would spit out coolant on the coldest morning after the first tight track, put a fan and never had an issue, since then ive fitted fans to all my bikes from day one....

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+1 on the fan, although not a smoker my old 2013 350 excf would spit out coolant on the coldest morning after the first tight track, put a fan and never had an issue, since then ive fitted fans to all my bikes from day one....

The physics behind Liquid Intelligence justified it for me. I've been running it for over 100 hours without an issue.

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2 hours ago, Murdoch said:


The physics behind Liquid Intelligence justified it for me. I've been running it for over 100 hours without an issue.

ive heard very good things about that product also

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ive heard very good things about that product also

Yeah, its great stuff. I thought it was another 'waterless water' gimmick at first until I read what it was made of. Its molecular fluid density per litre is 40% more than water, so not only does it have more heat stability at high temperatures, it actually conducts heat faster.

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On 4/1/2019 at 5:13 PM, Murdoch said:


Yeah, its great stuff. I thought it was another 'waterless water' gimmick at first until I read what it was made of. Its molecular fluid density per litre is 40% more than water, so not only does it have more heat stability at high temperatures, it actually conducts heat faster.

my only concern is the product itself is designed to have a higher boiling point. the issue is to stop the engine getting so hot it 'spits' out the coolant/water. this product raises the boiling temp making it harder to reach the 'spit' point but that doesnt mean the engine is running any cooler.

 

a fan, which is my preference, helps the engine run cooler.

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my only concern is the product itself is designed to have a higher boiling point. the issue is to stop the engine getting so hot it 'spits' out the coolant/water. this product raises the boiling temp making it harder to reach the 'spit' point but that doesnt mean the engine is running any cooler.
 
a fan, which is my preference, helps the engine run cooler.

Spot on Biggie

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It really comes down to a matter of preference to be honest. And both points are valid; fans are tried and true. But you also need to take into account that the molecular density of the product allows it to absorb more heat than water.

(Careful to remember thermodynamic fluidity, that absorbing more heat does not necessarily make an atomically heavier substance hotter).

This, in turn with being able to dissipate heat faster, means less heat in the engine, more being radiated to atmosphere.

I have used an infrared thermometer on several occasions to disprove my own skepticism early on when I started using liquid intelligence. My bike won't run hotter than 93 degrees, in winter its even less due to cooler ambient temperatures, unless of course there are some real good hills...!!

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4 hours ago, Gypsy501 said:


All bikes should come with a fan

Someone should invent air cooled engines with an oil cooling radiator.

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  • Haha 1

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Someone should invent air cooled engines with an oil cooling radiator.

Is that s Suzuki SACS reference?
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