Mousse tube set ups??


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Overall I like it.

Just the beauty of not having to worry about sharp rocks and pinch flats. Not having to worry about tyre pressures, holding spare tubes etc.

That all said, I haven't yet ran them in the peak of winter, so I can't give a complete review. Depending on traction in the winter will determine if I continue running them.

The nitro soft front in my opinion is too soft. It feels like 6psi and doesn't handle the way I like. If I had my time again, I would go the standard nitro in the front. I think there like 8-10 psi

What tyres are you running with them just out of curiosity?
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I am currently on my second rear tyre with the same 6-8psi mousse, I changed it for the NYE at dissa and it looked fine. I estimate it would be around 30-40 hours old. Quite easy to fit, even with 2 bead locks.

In terms of performance, I love it. Been using it with very soft carcass, wide tread MaxxCross Soft MX tyres, gives a very wide footprint.

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7 minutes ago, Murdoch said:

I am currently on my second rear tyre with the same 6-8psi mousse, I changed it for the NYE at dissa and it looked fine. I estimate it would be around 30-40 hours old. Quite easy to fit, even with 2 bead locks.

In terms of performance, I love it. Been using it with very soft carcass, wide tread MaxxCross Soft MX tyres, gives a very wide footprint.

Awesome, good to hear!!! I tried mine for the first time yesterday so good to hear the hours it’s getting!!

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1 hour ago, Crusty350 said:

Overall I like it.

Just the beauty of not having to worry about sharp rocks and pinch flats. Not having to worry about tyre pressures, holding spare tubes etc.

That all said, I haven't yet ran them in the peak of winter, so I can't give a complete review. Depending on traction in the winter will determine if I continue running them.

The nitro soft front in my opinion is too soft. It feels like 6psi and doesn't handle the way I like. If I had my time again, I would go the standard nitro in the front. I think there like 8-10 psi

Definately go the standard!! On a technical detail mx store at the moment only sell the nm21 220 but the nitro chart recommends the nm21 235( slightly bigger) for starcross soft fronts. You can get them from the states. 

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Been running mousses for 2 yrs now with the exception (rear) of the last 2 mths or after the lockdown and this my take:
Mousse Pros:
- You don't get punctures.
- You literally hit everything as you don't worry about punctures.
- You don't worry about tyre pressures.
- You don't carry levers.
- You don't carry a tube(s).
Mousse Cons:
- Expensive
- If you don't maintain them (run dry or let in water) or often run high speed they will be destroyed as heat+mousse=time-to-buy-a-new-one.
- They shrink over time - when they feel like the tyre is rolling, time to change or insert more pieces.
- You need to insure you buy the correct size mousse for your tyre especially the front - run a 90/100 and buy a 80/100 12psi mousse, the tyre gfeels like it will roll off, low pressure like 6psi or just roll off after 10-20hrs
- A 12psi mousse feels a lot firmer then a 12psi tube.
- Stuck on one pressure (for a while) - you buy a 12psi mousse and want to make it 8psi? Either wait  or cut a section off, cut the crown off or drill holes
- They are heavy (personally don't really notice it on the bike).
- Need to check/tighten spokes more often as you smash things more.

Dead Feel - There is a ‘dead’ feeling which Gypsy points out, tubes gives better feedback as a mousses are foam and therefore dense, so when you bounce a  tyre/mousse won’t spring back anywhere near like a tyre/tube at 12psi as a mousse closed cell foam vs a bit of 4mm rubber filled with air. It is noticeable at first ride (front) in corners but more so at speed – l really didn’t notice the front end until l got into flowing, fastish technical trails and then l adjusted.

Sizing – As Buzz pointed out, sizing is key especially for the front, no so much the rear,  as you are stuck with that size tyre for the time you want that mousse. I started with a slightly used Michelin 80/100 front and Dunlop 110/100, l reckon the used Dunlop  felt like 10psi in a 120/100 which lasted me 2yrs and 50cm inserand felt like 6psi after 10-15hrs t before they started to tear and ooze lube. The Michelin front felt like 10-12psi  and further softened to 7-10 psi but felt unnerving for a front tyre on transport section or your Bendigo ride, techie stuff it felt grouse but l soon felt the tyre folding in in corners (didn't help that it was in a 90/100 StarX 5 Soft)  - Buzz, Michelins last longer but you are right, they are way firmer than the claimed 12psi, like the 12-14psi and when l sampled a freshie on a  StarX 5 soft, l reckon it felt more  like 14psi

Tyre Carcass – IMO, huge variable!! Found this out when recently running tubliss on the rear, a Shinko at 0-2psi on tubliss l knew it was flat but the stiffer carcass held up well but in a new mousse, or one that is slightly run in, @12psi it felt too stiff and had to wait to really soften up or take a section off until it felt 8psi. On a Kenda Ibex which is a softer carcass, you knew it was flat and could not ride that at 0-2psi on tubliss. So getting the right tyre carcass for a mousse is important on the rear as my personal preference is a 10-12psi mousse front mousse but want 6-8 or even 4-6psi on the rear.

Mousse Manufacturer’s – Much of muchness but Michelin’s last longer followed by Dunlop and felt much firmer than my Nitro Mousse 12psi front. The Hattah boys l know only run Michie or Dunlop and last them a season of racing and trail riding. At least Nitro, Gibsons and a few others smaller, boutique mousse companies are coming out with more hard enduro/technical focused, lower pressure  bibs.

Maintenance – Key is to make them last!! Cut an old tube valve and silicone in place, it will help you pop the bead if needed but also stops water coming in. Use red rubber grease rather that the mousse lube as its more resistant to temp and water, and don’t be shy again, this is from the Hattah boys that l know who swear by it and don't have the budget to buy new mousses every event or two.

Two rim locks on mousses? Whatever floats you boat because the only time you'll notice is if you've seen the tyre moved with one rimlock, aside from that......it's not like it's going to go flat.

Overall,  l’m happy with Nitro front mousse @12psi on a 90/100, l will be putting in a lightly shrunk Nitro 120/100 12psi mousse (the softs where out of stock when l ordered) and l reckon this and Kenda on the rear come Autumn time will be awesome, I’ll adjust the pressure by taking out a section and feel that otherwise I’ll experiment with cutting the crown before drilling holes (shortens the lifespan) – really need to keep old mousses if you want to add sections.

Mousses are expensive, they do take time to adjust especially when new, you will curse at in the wet as you want to drop the rear pressures down to 5-6psi but can’t (unless you do some renovations) or the thing steps out heaps in the open stuff. But, as Gypsy said, it is a compromise between handling characteristics of tubes or tublss vs no punctures.

 

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Been running mousses for 2 yrs now with the exception (rear) of the last 2 mths or after the lockdown and this my take:
Mousse Pros:
- You don't get punctures.
- You literally hit everything as you don't worry about punctures.
- You don't worry about tyre pressures.
- You don't carry levers.
- You don't carry a tube(s).
Mousse Cons:
- Expensive
- If you don't maintain them (run dry or let in water) or often run high speed they will be destroyed as heat+mousse=time-to-buy-a-new-one.
- They shrink over time - when they feel like the tyre is rolling, time to change or insert more pieces.
- You need to insure you buy the correct size mousse for your tyre especially the front - run a 90/100 and buy a 80/100 12psi mousse, the tyre gfeels like it will roll off, low pressure like 6psi or just roll off after 10-20hrs
- A 12psi mousse feels a lot firmer then a 12psi tube.
- Stuck on one pressure (for a while) - you buy a 12psi mousse and want to make it 8psi? Either wait  or cut a section off, cut the crown off or drill holes
- They are heavy (personally don't really notice it on the bike).
- Need to check/tighten spokes more often as you smash things more.

Dead Feel - There is a ‘dead’ feeling which Gypsy points out, tubes gives better feedback as a mousses are foam and therefore dense, so when you bounce a  tyre/mousse won’t spring back anywhere near like a tyre/tube at 12psi as a mousse closed cell foam vs a bit of 4mm rubber filled with air. It is noticeable at first ride (front) in corners but more so at speed – l really didn’t notice the front end until l got into flowing, fastish technical trails and then l adjusted.

Sizing – As Buzz pointed out, sizing is key especially for the front, no so much the rear,  as you are stuck with that size tyre for the time you want that mousse. I started with a slightly used Michelin 80/100 front and Dunlop 110/100, l reckon the used Dunlop  felt like 10psi in a 120/100 which lasted me 2yrs and 50cm inserand felt like 6psi after 10-15hrs t before they started to tear and ooze lube. Tthe Michelin front felt like 10-12psi  and further softened to 7-10 psi but felt unnerving for a front tyre on transport section or your Bendigo ride, techie stuff it felt grouse but l soon felt the tyre folding in in corners (didn't helt that it was in a 90/100 StarX 5 Soft)  - Buzz, Michelins last longer but you are right, they are way firmer than the claimed 12psi, like the 12-14psi and when l sampled a freshie on a  StarX 5 soft, l reckon it felt more  like 14psi

Tyre Carcass – IMO, huge variable!! Found this out when recently running tubliss on the rear, a Shinko at 0-2psi on tubliss l knew it was flat but the stiffer carcass held up well but in a new mousse, or one that is slightly run in, @12psi it felt too stiff and had to wait to really soften up or take a section off until it felt 8psi. On a Kenda Ibex which is a softer carcass, you knew it was flat and could not ride that at 0-2psi on tubliss. So getting the right tyre carcass for a mousse is important on the rear as my personal preference is a 10-12psi mousse front mousse but want 6-8 or even 4-6psi on the rear.

Mousse Manufacturer’s – Much of muchness but Michelin’s last longer followed by Dunlop and felt much firmer than my Nitro Mousse 12psi front. The Hattah boys l know only run Michie or Dunlop and last them a season of racing and trail riding. At least Nitro, Gibsons and a few others smaller, boutique mousse companies are coming out with more hard enduro/technical focussed, lower pressure  bibs.
Maintenance – Key is  to make them last!! Cut an old tube valve and silicone in place, it will help you pop the bead if needed but also stops water coming in. Use red rubber grease rather that the mousse lube as its more resistant to temp and water, and don’t be shy again, this is from the Hattah boys that l know who swear by it and don't have the budget to buy new mousses every event or two.

Two rim locks on mousses? Whatever floats you boat because the only time you'll notice is if you've seen the tyre moved with one rimlock, aside from that......it's not like it's going to go flat.

Overall, I got  l’m happy with Nitro front mousse @12psi on a 90/100, l will be putting in a lightly shrunk Nitro 120/100 12psi mousse (the softs where out of stock when l ordered) and l reckon this and Kenda on the rear come Autumn time will be awesome, I’ll adjust the pressure by taking out a section and feel that otherwise I’ll experiment with cutting the crown before drilling holes (shortens the lifespan) – really need to keep old mousses if you want to add sections.

Mousses are expensive, they do take time to adjust especially when new, you will curse at in the wet as you want to drop the rear pressures down to 5-6psi but can’t (unless you do some renovations) or the thing steps out heaps in the open stuff. But, as Gypsy said, it is a compromise between handling characteristics of tubes or tublss vs no punctures.
 

Very solid feedback there, thanks mate
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Running the Moose on Murdoch style 3 + tracks on the weekend when we were ascending and climbing 45° mountains with only ribbons to follow I have to say the traction was awesome. As far as not carying tubes and levers I did get a puncture in my tubeless tyre on the front and unfortunately was carrying no plugs to fix. The 35 ks of riding back on a front flat that was fun. I am running 2 rim locks. And a maxxis soft rear tyre. The mousse i put in is a 10-12 psi. It has softened up to a nice cush feel. As far as feeling dead to ride on. I didn't notice it. It did however feel like I had a flat at times on the fire trail. This was the least of my concerns. Overall happy to smash sharp rocks ànd sq edge's knowing I am not going to get a flat.

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Running the Moose on Murdoch style 3 + tracks on the weekend when we were ascending and climbing 45° mountains with only ribbons to follow I have to say the traction was awesome. As far as not carying tubes and levers I did get a puncture in my tubeless tyre on the front and unfortunately was carrying no plugs to fix. The 35 ks of riding back on a front flat that was fun. I am running 2 rim locks. And a maxxis soft rear tyre. The mousse i put in is a 10-12 psi. It has softened up to a nice cush feel. As far as feeling dead to ride on. I didn't notice it. It did however feel like I had a flat at times on the fire trail. This was the least of my concerns. Overall happy to smash sharp rocks ànd sq edge's knowing I am not going to get a flat.

Good stuff mate, keep us updated as to the long term wear of the mousse
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I've been using Mousse's since 2012 0n my CFF 450.

That dead feeling I only notice when I jump on others tubed bikes and enjoy the plushness through sharper rocky bits but then quickly hand their bikes back in case I got them a puncture!

So far Dunlop have lasted the longest in my experience. 

Lube, I highly recommend XTEC MP SILICON GREASE  https://xtex.com.au/mp-silicone/  It has a 200oC melting point and I have never had any real heat problems that get mentioned. I also never maintain them between tyre changes. They are still fine. A wipe down and add some more lube then. Done lots of high speed and desert stuff with no worries.

You do get a confidence to hit stuff harder and not worry about pinch flats.

Unfortunately I am getting way to good of a life out of mine at the moment, they have been in there for years :( . I think the Dunlop has about 130 hrs ish. Think I have Dunlop fron and Nitro rear at the moment but I don't think the option to get soft ones was available at the time.

I don't run too many fancy grippy tyres but used to be bridgy mx 52/32 and now pirelli extra X something.

Once you use mousse for a while you build up a little supply and keep some spare to fill up the tyre when they do shrink.

I have broken a bead when fitting a brand new tyre once but thats on me for bad technique. I did spin a tyre last year on one of my few rides but that was because I broke the rim lock when fitting the tyre the night before.

You can glance over and observe others with tubes and tubliss flats and feel smug!

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Great topic 👍

About 18months ago I went down the path of a 1/2 mousse & tubliss setup in the rear accompanied with a full mousse in the front. 

The front I didn't have much success with seating the bead (SC5 soft). Even tried 2 X rimlocks with no luck. So after 20hours went back to the trusty tubliss with slime.

However the rear has been a pretty versatile system over the 120hours I've used it for. Best example would be on the wet/dreaded clay days🙃 I can run zero pressure but still have little cushion from the half mousse. This make for a more forgiving impact on obsticals like logs etc. For higher speeds/dry weather/ off chamber riding I just add a few psi in which stabilises the tyre a little further. 

 

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