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maccastrewth

Linkage removal and bearing replacement '17 TE300

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Hi everyone,

Virus got me doing things I have no idea about.  Please refer to my pics to allow my questions to make sense.

- Should the linkage just "pull" out from where it is now?  It seems to be very much fixed in it's position.

- When re-attaching, does anyone know the torque setting for Number 1?

- I will need to purchase bearing replacements for 1, 2 and 3, correct?  See second pic.  (#97 and #98).  

- Any other pro tips welcome, I'm well and truly learning as I go.

Thanks all, I hope splendid isolation is going well!

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I would be taking the other part of the linkage out & the shock to check if the bearings in these are shot also, it depends how long since they have been checked but the sleeves that sit in the bearings should come out pretty easily ? The bearings may be a bit harder, the best way to get he bearings out is soak them in WD40 then find a socket that matches the OD of the bearing, put the socket on the bearing face then open the vice so that you can push the socket through, you won't get all the bearing out like this.   You will need either a socket bigger than the OD of bearing or a short piece of pipe that the bearing can fit into  so that you can push the bearing out .

Then grease everything up & do the reverse of the dismantle, you could put the bearings in the freezer overnight to make it a bit easier to put them in, make sure you use a good quality grease, i use a Penrite bearing grease. Good luck, you've got plenty of time so just take it slowly & if something doesn't go well don't get the big hammer out, you could also heat up the linkages to help with getting bearings out

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22 minutes ago, eagle said:

I would be taking the other part of the linkage out & the shock to check if the bearings in these are shot also, it depends how long since they have been checked but the sleeves that sit in the bearings should come out pretty easily ?

Thank you Eagle.   Just to clarify a few points,

  • There is a sleeve that I must remove from #1 in the photo right?  Then the "3 holed section" will fall out?
  • When you say "taking the other part of the linkage out", do you mean the bit to the right of the shock in the photo?
  • The shock was worked on by Darren at Trac-rite and the suspension is nearly due for a service, so I was going to leave the shock and forks for him :D

Thanks also for the removal and install of the bearings tips.  Learnt a few lessons doing front and rear wheels previously.  Definitely agree with the "don't get the big hammer" part! :D 

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I'm thinking the 2 # 8's & 14 are a sleeve that sit inside the bearing, there will be small endcaps holding them in, yes i'm talking about the piece to the right of picture that has what i would call 2 long arms.

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Same advice as Eagle from me

a couple of tips/comments 

the linkage (or knuckle) should drop or fall out now but it may be a bit bound up so a tap from directly behind with thin rubber hammer, bit of wood should dislodge it

you might find the three bearings are still salvageable* (depends on hours and if you’ve done it before)

the lower shock bearing is the first to go dry, usually twice as quick as the other two. (I sometimes just clean and regrease that one at say 40 hours then the whole lot at 80 - example hours only).  
 

if your knuckle bearings are shot/dry then for sure the wishbone ones will need to be checked, at best, clean and regrease, worst, replacement.   I’d be checking the swingarm too if your other bearings need doing. 
 

torque setting for # 1 & 2 is 80nms and 60 for the smaller shock bearing #3 
 

*salvageable bearings, it’s time consuming but if they haven’t gone dry or rusty You can prise out the needle rollers, clean up both the needles and the bearing housing and repack with fresh grease. I lightly sand back the pins/surfaces too.   

 

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from my experience number 3 takes the most punishment and will be stuffed first, 

sometimes it's the only one that needs replacing just re grease the others , 

number 2 seems to be next in line to be stuffed 

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Hi Macca,

The linkage (3 hole assembly) should fall out of the swingarm. Give it a little gentle help with a block of wood and a rubber mallet. 

As far as the bearings, each one has a cylindrical roller with end caps. They don't just slide out. Use a right angled pick tool to pull the ends off so you can clean and re-grease each bearing.

Here's a new one assembled.

IMG_5320.thumb.jpeg.aba40c5f4107da55c5bf0c5a6edb86bf.jpeg

 

Disassembled:

IMG_5319.thumb.jpeg.705ff2e049e030a3391827020cfa5311.jpeg

 

And showing the internal ridge that you grab with a pick so you can remove the end cap to get it out of the linkage:

IMG_5321.thumb.jpeg.f9aafd5d4e4e548c1f256e77e63a5c59.jpeg

 

Some of the roller bearings have cages to stop the needles falling out, some don't so be prepared by working on a tray on your workbench.

I would also check your swingarm bearings while you are at it.

I'm happy to do a FaceTime chat to help you if you want.

Cheers,

Phil

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14 hours ago, Phil66 said:

Hi Macca,

The linkage (3 hole assembly) should fall out of the swingarm. Give it a little gentle help with a block of wood and a rubber mallet. 

As far as the bearings, each one has a cylindrical roller with end caps. They don't just slide out. Use a right angled pick tool to pull the ends off so you can clean and re-grease each bearing.

Some of the roller bearings have cages to stop the needles falling out, some don't so be prepared by working on a tray on your workbench.

I would also check your swingarm bearings while you are at it.

I'm happy to do a FaceTime chat to help you if you want.

Cheers,

Phil

Hi Phil,

Mate, thanks for the explanation and pics.  I managed to get the linkage to fall out with a slight bit of encouragement.  These bearings didn't have cages for the needles, learned that pretty quickly. :)  

I definitely felt movement from the linkage bearings before disassembly.  All linkage bearings have about 110 hours on them, so I figure it's worthwhile just changing all of them at this point.  Swingarm bearings were done at 60 hours, so I may just re-grease those as there was no movement from them when all assembled.

Appreciate the help mate!  I'll message you if I get stuck.  :) 

 

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Bit of an update.

Removal of bearings was great, not difficult once I got the hang of it.  Decided to include the swingarm (as recommended by y'all) also.  

Installation of larger linkage and swingarm are done.  Waiting on a vice to do the smaller linkage bearing and a blind bearing puller to do the pull rod.

Can't believe I was worried about this one.  Been super easy and really enjoyed the process.  Cheers for the help.

 

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To help pull the bearings you can gently heat the swingarm with a propane torch - same when you go to put the new ones in.  You can freeze the bearings over night and they slide in easier.

On one of my bikes which was bought used I had a terrible time trying to pull the bearings they were stuck that bad.  Eventually to get them out I used a trick my dad taught me - I removed all of the needle bearings out of the cups them I TIGed a bead of weld around the inside of the cup and let it cool.  Bearings came out easily then.

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