Depression
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This is a topic close to my heart, as someone who has suffered and still suffers from depression and anxiety.

I would lay money on it, that there are other members on here who are in the same boat, and have suffered from anxiety or depression or both at some stage.

 

I hope the below text proves helpful to some out there.

 

People think depression is sadness.

People think depression is crying

. People think depression is dressing in black.

But people are wrong.

Depression is the constant feeling of being numb.

Being numb to emotions, being numb to life. You wake up in the morning just to go back to bed again. Days aren’t really days, they are just annoying obstacles that need to be faced.

When you’re depressed, you grasp on to anything that can get you through the day. Even in a strange way you fall in love with your depression because you think it's all you have.

It's not being able to see a way out, to see something good, to feel normal. That’s what depression is, not sadness or tears, it’s the overwhelming sense of numbness and the desire for anything that can help you make it from one day to the next. Please don't suffer in silence and alone. Reach out and ask for help..

 

 

People with depression or anxiety can find it difficult to take the first step in getting help. They may need to enlist the support of family members, friends or a health professional to start on the road to recovery. This wonderful cartoon is by the artist Colleen Butters, it demonstrates the importance of taking that first step in reaching out for help. You can find Colleen's blog, 'Solar Citrus', and the original post here: http://solar-citrus.tumblr.com/tagged/art

You can get started on the road to recovery by visiting http://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/get-started-nowor by getting in touch with our Support Service here: www.beyondblue.org.au/getsupport

 

 

With busy schedules, it’s easy to become overwhelmed with work and not find time for anything else. The trick is achieving a balance that promotes your overall health and the success of your career or business. Stress is a normal response to the pressures and demands of work, but prolonged or excessive job stress can be damaging to your mental health. Stress at work can trigger anxiety or can cause an existing condition to worsen

If you're feeling stressed or anxious, finding someone to talk to can help – either a close friend, a family member, counsellor or psychologist. Make sure you allocate time to do the things you enjoy, such as exercising, meditating, reading, gardening or listening to music. If you do notice serious changes in your thoughts, feelings or behaviour, see your GP or health professional. The earlier a mental health condition is treated, the earlier it can be resolved.

To find out how you can manage work stress visit: http://bb.org.au/1EkbaWd

 

Research has confirmed loneliness and social isolation are major mental health risks for Australian men. One in four, or 1.1 million of you, have few or no social connections and less than two-thirds of you are satisfied with the quality of your friendships.

Strong social support is an excellent protective factor against anxiety and depression. While women tend to make new friends when their circumstances change, it appears that men don’t. Commitments such as family and a career should not stop friendships – men need to put in the effort to foster and maintain them. If you are feeling isolated or lonely, there is a lot can do to change that, including becoming a volunteer, playing a sport or joining a club, or connecting with someone you've fallen out of touch with.

Anyone experiencing distress as a result of loneliness can contact our Support Service 24/7 on 1300 22 4636, or via web chat from 3pm to midnight (AEDST) here: www.beyondblue.org.au/getsupport

You can view the full research report at: http://bit.ly/mensconnectedness. The research was funded with generous donations from The Movember Foundation. Movember Australia

 

Australia is suffering because too many organisations are not taking action on mental health. Our Mentally Healthy Workplace Alliance partners The Black Dog Institute & UNSW (The University of New South Wales) have taken one step to address this identifying six factors for creating a mentally healthy workplace and a five-step process for implementing them. You can take a look at what they've outlined here: http://bit.ly/creatingmentallyhealthyworkplaces

Do you agree? Is there anything you think should be added?

Our Heads Up website provides a host of resources to help businesses work through these recommendations, including an online action plan tool that organisations can tailor to suit their specific needs and priorities. Take a look here: www.headsup.org.com.au

 

If you can add to this thread in any way you feel comfortable of fit to do so, please don't hesitate to share.

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I've been feeling it for quite some time, like life is slipping away & it slowly gets worse. It's a very hard thing to explain in words. I don't like to talk about it & writing it here weirdly feels like a massive risk. All I can say is thank christ for my mates & dirt bikes.

 

To anyone else who is suffering. Don't turn to alcohol or cigarettes, it only makes it worse & harder to turn around.

 

Thanks to Geoffro & the other admin for putting this topic up.

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I know someone who is very close to me and has depression, this video is for people who don't understand what depression is:

 

I had a black dog, his name was depression

 

 

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That disconnect and numb feeling towards anything pretty much sums it up.

But I'd like to raise the point, from my experience and what I've seen in others, that not everyone feeling that will show it. I think people who have felt disconnected for a long time, that really push hard to make a change, try and maintain their friendships, work and hobbies can be affected the most. It's frequently a shock to friends and family when they discover just how bad someone can be deep down.

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That disconnect and numb feeling towards anything pretty much sums it up.

But I'd like to raise the point, from my experience and what I've seen in others, that not everyone feeling that will show it. I think people who have felt disconnected for a long time, that really push hard to make a change, try and maintain their friendships, work and hobbies can be affected the most. It's frequently a shock to friends and family when they discover just how bad someone can be deep down.

 

Too true.

 

And thats one of the hardest things to break.

 

Holding it all in and "trying" to be "normal" is exhausting...

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Great post Fro. It has crossed my mind in the past that given the broad demographic of the forum, that an connection with say Beyond Blue would a great alliance.

If raising awareness and promoting discussion about depression saves one family, marriage or life then it's a great thing

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Have to agree with everything said. After starting a family, getting a house, having a kid I lost contact with a lot of 'friends' and found myself loathing going to work, getting angry at the drop of a hat as if I was being accused of something and everyday just turned into a blur so that all I was doing was the motions, not actually seeing or enjoying anything. (Sounds chiché but it's exactly how it felt to me)

It's been a bit of a journey, but a big help was just getting out and meeting a few new faces that just wanted to enjoy a common activity!!

Every now and then I struggle with staying positive, but I look back to see how far I have come and realise it's worth the struggle

Now I am enjoying a lot more of life, family and look forward to catching up with the people I have met for a ride and meeting more new faces and if I can help anyone that is in a similar situation, then I will do all that I can!!

So all in all, I have to give a big shout out to dirtriderZ and to the people I have ridden with and will ride with in the future.

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Wow... I was very hesitant in writing my first comment here, I'm now glad I did to see I'm not alone (kinda, if you know what I mean)

Marko's video is so accurate it's scary. Who ever made it, knows this daemon well.

This is the first time I've spoken about it to anyone & I've known I've had it for 'at least' two years. To admit something like this, to me in my mind is being weak & a looser & asking for help, even more so. For me, reaching out to my partner is asking to be yelled at for doing something stupid like a little kid, not the the support or understanding you're desperate for. Like Hoff said, drinking 7 days a week is damaging so many ways but it becomes a way of life & when your friends & family think you're 'just an alcoholic' you feel more alone than ever.

I'm not writing this for a pat on the back or a hug, I put myself here. It's my job to sort it out (that's the way I see it anyways) but please if you are reading this & you feel it coming on... STOP!!! Tell someone close to you your feelings before it gets to the point that you can't anymore.

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Well done Geoffro for starting this thread. I hope that other members that are or have been in the same boat as Hoff and Bikenut will give an insight into depression allowing us to support them in any way we can. Well done guys.

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I have suffered for the last 20 years. I've lost friends due to it. Sometimes you don't know how bad it is till you hit the bottom, when you've withdrawn for everyone and sit there struggling not to end it all . People would always offer advice on what to do, but that just pushed me further away, getting angry at them because it's scary and you can't control it. Sometimes all you need is not for anyone to try and help, but to just be there as support. Even if not a word is said. I just recently had a low point 3 weeks ago. To the extent that they were going to admit me for my safety.

It's hard for men as we are not meant to show weakness (well that was social expectation as we grew up back then) I work in the firearm industry and a long serving volunteer firefighter/medic. And sometimes I just want to crawl into a ball and cry... I've only recently started making this knowledge public, and raised near $3k of movember to help out.

So if you know someone who suffers, just let them know your there for them.

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Great step forward guys. It is probably the hardest part, letting friends and family know. There is no shame and I'm sure everyone on this forum would agree, Whe're in this together and open to support anyone on this forum.

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Yes, I have had mental health issues.

Yes I have suffered depression.

Yes I have suffered anxity.

Yes I have felt lonliness.  

Yes I have been out of control.

 

But still feel like its been a good trip. 

I still feel like one of the lucky ones 

 

My tips: rest, rest and more rest. 

            :seek medical advice.(maybe a step up from a GP)

            :modern meds have improved. 

            :seek financial, employment assistance.(there are lots of people paid to help disadvantaged people)

            :I find cooking dinner helps settle me. 

            :Stay active but don't over do it.  

            :Trying to work full time, trying to be a hero on a bike, parting regularly and a unhealthy lifestyle increases general risk factors.

 

Full credit to Geoffro.

Dirtriderz is working just the way it should.

Dirtriderz, bringing people together.

 

I have seen how the support systems work.ie docs, meds, centerlink. employment assistance, ect 

If anybody needs advice on getting hooked up PM me. 

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Got to agree with you Geoffro I have suffered for year from anxiety and was all way angry at the drop of a hat or wanted to hurt my self but I to got help not long ago and went to my doctor for help and was the best thing I ever did

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Talking about it is the best medicine. Medication is not for everyone, and is not recommended for teenagers, as it may increase the risk of suicide.

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Wow.

I read the original post when it got posted and didn't look back at it.

The responses to this deamon is fantastic to see that people can open up about it.

I am sure we all have a bit of depression. Anxiety. Anger etc etc inside us. And we all deal with it differently.

I too had the anger and anxiety a few years ago.

I would work 50-60hrs a week(thinking this was helping my family get ahead in life. Wrong.)

I got heavily involved in bike (push bike) riding to release some built up energy to the fact I rode 400-500 klm each week and did the massive hours at work. (I was spending more time on my bike than I was at home)

It wasn't until a life long best friend pulled me aside and told me to my face that I had a problem and if I keep going that i will lose my loved ones.

I went and saw the Dr who has helped me get to where I am today.

Yes. I still do exercise.

Yes. I spend more time with my family.

Yes. I am glad that I can talk to people if I need too.

And the biggest positive is that I don't feel ashamed or embarrassed about it.

To all the above memberz who have posted above well done for posting your personal life up.

I will also ride with you like Dakota mentioned earlier.

There is a great fundraising event which I follow and support.

http://www.blackdogride.com.au

Maybe something like this but in the dirtbike scene is required.

Lucas

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Maybe something like this but in the dirtbike scene is required.

Sounds like a great theme for a Dakota style "2.5 +OMG Cobaw ride". With a voluntary donation to suitable depression support organisation

Headline act for the the ride could be the Fro, who had the courage to make the original post.

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Sounds like a great theme for a Dakota style "2.5 +OMG Cobaw ride". With a voluntary donation to suitable depression support organisation

Headline act for the the ride could be the Fro, who had the courage to make the original post.

Hatching a plan
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Depression,

It can be from so many things, you don't relise you have most of the time until someone steps up and says, hay man, think you need to talk to someone. I was a very happy going care free guy and was happy with life, had a awesome job, just got married to my lovely wife, we were expecting our first child then things started to go down hill.

First was my cat, I know most guys are dog people but I loved my cat and he died from suspicious reasons, a few weeks later my wife wheat into early labour at 24 weeks and we were rushed to melbourne and 5 days later my son past away. While I was off work getting over this my dad was diagnosed with terminal cancer and was given a few months. I got back to work and being in government they sacked a heap and I was one, first day back and told sorry but you no longer have a job. Found a shit job and then dad past away a few months later.

Since then we have had 7 miscarriages and a few jobs and have lost most of my friends because I got so agree with the world and all I did was winge, complain and just not fun to be around. I eventually sore a shrink and and it was a long road to get to were we are now. The percentage of marriages that brake up under similar circumstances is about 88% but we stuck it through and I have 2 very close friends that stuck with us and made a huge difference with getting through.

I'm not I guy who talks to strangers about this stuff. I'm a country guy that keeps to him self buy had to learne there are things out there that I can't control and will need help with. There are worse off than us and I'm lucky to have a awesome wife and good friends that stuck around.

I still suffer from it in the way I need to be around friends every now and then and they know this and are happy to just go bush or go away for a weekend or just come out sit in the shed for a drink and that's all I need to cheer me up.

My wife and I are on attemp number 8 for a baby and we are at 18 weeks and every thing is going awesome but I still have in the back of my mind what if this one fails. Can my wife handle it, can I handle it. These things play on your mind

Now if you think you need to talk to someone than please do. If you think someone you know needs to talk to someone please talk to them and start the journey to help them get better.

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Plus one to ^.

Hope all goes well with this pregnancy.

Sounds like you need some luck going your way for once.

Glad you wrote your post Tazzy and that you have some very good friends that are sticking with both your wife and yourself.

Keep us updated with the bubs.

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Well done Geoffro for starting this and for the guys sharing your experiences!

RESPECT!

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